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Further facing changes coming for the PLL

In a surprise move, the Premier Lacrosse League is further modifying the faceoff prior to the 2024 season. The prevalence of the “prevent” faceoff strategy has resulted in a series of rule modifications. While some modifications were announced earlier in the spring, this morning another round of changes are expected to be announced. 


Beginning in 2024, personnel available for faceoffs and wings will be dictated by the time and location of the game being played, and referee control of the faceoff has been expanded. A summary of the new rules adjustments.


  • On even numbered weeks, unless the game is being played in a west coast time zone, teams will be required to have a right handed short stick player on each wing for faceoffs during the first and third quarters, and a left handed pole on both wings in the second and fourth quarters. 

  • On odd numbered weeks before the All Star break, the four pole limit rule is suspended for faceoffs and all players on the field must have a long stick, though they have to sub off and go get their short sticks before the expiration of the now 37 second post faceoff shot clock. 

  • After the All Star break on odd weeks, the league leader in faceoff percentage is only permitted to take faceoffs that follow goals which result in the total score being an odd number, so long as that player has attempted at least 50 faceoffs during the current season. This will be monitored in real time and can change during game action. 

  • When the game is tied, the faceoff will occur at midfield between short sticks. Otherwise, the faceoff will occur at the top of the two point arc around the goal that is being attacked by the team currently losing. 

  • Officials can award a goal to the team of a faceoff specialist who successfully performs a “monkey roll”, but cannot stop game action. The official must signal to the sideline and award the goal while play continues so that gameplay pace remains high.

  • Referee cadence for the faceoff will now be a down call, followed by a 14 second pause during which every single player on the field must remain completely motionless, a set call, and then the referee will stand up, back away, and when he’s ready, signal the sideline to fire a starting gun like they use in the 100m dash. For player safety, referees must remain 16 yards away from the faceoff while they officiate it.

  • PLL leadership on site at games may decide at any time and for any reasons to suspend faceoffs for the duration of the contest, instead having goalies restart the game as they do in the Olympic Sixes format. PLL leadership can also restore faceoffs to the game at any time. 


One faceoff specialist reached for comment said, “I’m so tired. Please let it end. I’m so tired.”


A cell phone number that was used by another faceoff specialist was answered by a man who said, “thanks for calling Enterprise Rent-A-Car, how can I assist you?”; the reader is invited to draw their own conclusions.


League officials say competition, feedback, and pace of play were the primary drivers of the rule changes. 


“As we continue to grow professional lacrosse, we remain committed to collecting gameday data, as well as player, coach and fan feedback, such that we can continue to evaluate ways to enhance the gameplay and evolve our rules, with a focus on player safety and high-performance,” said a league officer.


When it was pointed out that this was the exact same thing the league said for the last round of faceoff rule changes, the league officer said, “As we continue to grow professional lacrosse, we remain committed to collecting gameday data, as well as player, coach and fan feedback, such that we can continue to evaluate ways to enhance the gameplay and evolve our rules, with a focus on player safety and high-performance.”


Reactions by fans and popular lacrosse accounts on social media were wide ranging. One fan was quick to point out that despite how archaic they may be, none of these rule changes stop Zach Currier from being a cheat code. The TLN social accounts posted a clip of a basic faceoff during pregame warm ups from 2022 with the caption, “WOULD YOU THROW THE FLAG???” Several PLL-affiliated accounts simply posted “Big Moves” with a series of rocket and graph going up emojis.


Jerry Ragonese could not be reached for comment on the changes, because he deleted his entire digital presence with the exception of one Instagram video where he said he was moving his family to Japan, and then threw his phone in the ocean at the jersey shore.


This is a developing story that is in no way true. 


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